Homily for the first Sunday of Advent - Year A - Mt. 24:37-44
 
 
by
 
Canon Dr. Daniel Meynen
 
 
 
" As were the days of Noah, so will be the coming of the Son of man. For as in those days before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day when Noah entered the ark, and they did not know until the flood came and swept them all away, so will be the coming of the Son of man. Then two men will be in the field; one is taken and one is left. Two women will be grinding at the mill; one is taken and one is left. Watch therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming. But know this, that if the householder had known in what part of the night the thief was coming, he would have watched and would not have let his house be broken into. Therefore you also must be ready; for the Son of man is coming at an hour you do not expect. "
 
 
 
Homily:
 
 
" As were the days of Noah, so will be the coming of the Son of man. For as in those days before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day when Noah entered the ark, and they did not know until the flood came and swept them all away, so will be the coming of the Son of man. "
 
A new liturgical year begins, a year that, as always, will be dominated by the feast of Easter, March 27, 2005! Whether it is Advent, Lent, or the Ordinary Time of the year, Easter is always celebrated: each Sunday announces to us or reminds us of the central event of the liturgical year, which is the Sunday of the Resurrection!
 
By Baptism in Jesus Christ, and through the grace of God, by the virtues that accompany the sacrament of regeneration, namely the virtues of faith, hope, and charity, we are already resurrected. By Baptism, we are made participants in the divine nature, through participation in the Passion of the Lord Jesus. By Baptism, we all await the Return of the Lord!
 
By Baptism, of which Noah and the flood he underwent are an image (cf. 1 Peter 3:21), we already touch blessed eternity, in the measure that we participate in the Passion of the Lord. By Baptism, we have accepted, or our godfather and godmother have accepted on our behalf, to accompany Christ in his Passion, to complete what is lacking in his sufferings (cf. Col. 1:24), in order that, by our own merits, lost among the immensity of the merits of Christ Jesus, we might be found worthy of eternal Life!
 
Resurrected, we await the Lord Jesus. But we do not await him in idleness: we await him while doing the Work of God, we await him while believing in Him (cf. Jn. 6:29), that is to say as we accomplish all of our temporal tasks in and through faith, in a supernatural spirit, remaining perfectly detached from the goods of this world, in order to be attached solely to the Lord himself.
 
" So will be the coming of the Son of man. Then two men will be in the field; one is taken and one is left. Two women will be grinding at the mill; one is taken and one is left. "
 
Jesus does not say to his disciples that, at his Return, people will be awaiting him here or there, perhaps watching the sky, or the television, just as, a few years ago, we watched the Apollo capsule land in the ocean... No, nothing of the sort. Jesus offers as examples people who are diligent in their daily work.
 
Why will one man be taken and another left? And similarly for the women? Simply because, among men and women, there are few (50% maximum) who live and act with sufficient detachment from the goods of this world to be found worthy of eternal Life...
 
" Watch therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming. But know this, that if the householder had known in what part of the night the thief was coming, he would have watched and would not have let his house be broken into. Therefore you also must be ready; for the Son of man is coming at an hour you do not expect. "
 
Let us suppose for a moment that the Lord Jesus had told us that he would return after so many days and years; and that, by chance, we would be able to calculate the exact day of his Return. Of course, this is a completely arbitrary supposition, one that rests on many probabilities, the principal one of which is lacking at the moment: that is, we cannot precisely calculate, for example, the number of days separating us from the birth of Christ.
 
Even if the Lord had given us a date for his Return, we would still have to believe him! And so we see that everything comes down to this: believing in the Lord, in hope and in charity! Let us ask Mary, our model and our Mother in the faith, to deign to watch over us, in order that we might remain watchful in our faith in her Son Jesus and that we might thus already be resurrected, each day of our life! Amen!
 

To order the weekly homily immediately, click here